Dry Creek

Earthen berms were constructed to capture runoff water from the agricultural drainage.

The ponds that form behind the berms allow dirty water to settle, and release clean water slowly. By reducing the rate of flow (from 175 cubic feet per second to 42 cubic feet per second),downstream erosion is also decreased.

The Pond created by the earthen berm near the trail reaches the base of the trees more than 100 feet north of the dam during periods of peak runoff. A second pond with a permanent pool of over and acre is located on private property to the north.

Sediment Basins

Earthen berms were constructed to capture runoff water from agricultural drainage. The ponds that formed behind the berms allow dirty water to settle, and release clean water slowly. By reducing the rate of flow, downstream erosion is also decreased. The pond created by the earthen berm reaches the base of the trees more than 100 feet north of the dam during periods of peak runoff. A second pond with a permanent pool over an acre is located on private property to the north.

Wetland Restorations

Wetlands were restored through the removal of drainage tiles installed to increase the land available for farming. These wetlands now serve to capture runoff water and provide habitat for pond-dwelling creatures.

Prairie Restoration

Ten acres of native prairie were planted here in 1999. Prairies provide habitat for butterflies and grassland birds. Burning is used occasionally to reduce growth of weeds, shrubs, and trees.

Tire Clean-up

Over twenty truckloads of discarded tires were removed from the streambed as part of this project. A water diversion directs clean runoff away from a farmstead and down a rock waterway to the stream.

“Look deep, deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better.”

~ Albert Einstein